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Posts for: February, 2018

By Fox River Dental Batavia
February 26, 2018
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.


By Fox River Dental Batavia
February 18, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
ToFightToothDecayReduceBADfactorsPromoteSAFEOnes

Humanity has been waging war against tooth decay for millennia — with this relentless opponent often getting the better of us.

Over the last century, however, significant treatment advances have turned the tide of battle in our favor. Perhaps the greatest of these advancements is our deeper grasp of the disease process — new understandings that have altered our treatment strategy. Rather than wait for cavities to occur and then repair the damage, we now focus on stopping the damage from occurring in the first place.

Prevention starts by reducing factors that contribute to tooth decay. We can signify these detrimental factors with the acronym BAD:

Bad Bacteria. Millions of bacteria inhabit our mouths at any one time, but only a few strains produce the acid that causes decay. We want to reduce their population by removing dental plaque (where they feed and grow) through daily brushing and flossing, and, at a minimum, semi-annual office cleanings.

Absence of Saliva. This important fluid neutralizes acid and strengthens tooth enamel. Some people, however, suffer from reduced saliva flow. We want to find the cause (for example, a side effect of certain prescription drugs) and then improve saliva flow.

Dietary Habits. A diet heavy in sugar and acid (particularly sodas and soft drinks) gives bacteria a ready food source and increases the mouth’s acidic level. Chronic high acid levels in particular are often too great for normal saliva flow to overcome and neutralize. Reducing the amount and frequency of these food items creates a healthier oral environment.

Reducing BAD factors is only half of our prevention focus. We also want to promote SAFE factors that enhance tooth health and strength: Sealants, especially for children, that shield tooth surfaces from decay; Antimicrobial rinses that target and rid the mouth of acid-producing bacteria and give healthy bacteria room to develop; Fluoride, a proven enamel-strengthening chemical available in dental products, many drinking water systems and as a topical application in dental offices; and an Effective diet that’s rich in nutrients and low in sugar and acid as already mentioned.

Keeping the focus on reducing BAD factors and promoting SAFE factors will greatly increase your chances of personally winning the war against tooth decay.

If you would like more information on the prevention and treatment of tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How to Assess Your Risk.”


By Fox River Dental Batavia
February 03, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: medicine  
WhytheOintmentYoureUsingCouldbeMakingYourFacialRashWorse

The red, scaly rash suddenly appearing on your face doesn’t cause you much physical discomfort, but it’s still embarrassing. And to make matters worse treating it as you would other skin ailments seems to make it worse.

Your ailment might be a particular skin condition known as peri-oral dermatitis. Although its overall occurrence is fairly low (1% or less of the population worldwide) it seems to be more prevalent in industrialized countries like the United States, predominantly among women ages 20-45.

Peri-oral dermatitis can appear on the skin as a rash of small red bumps, pimples or blisters. You usually don’t feel anything but some patients can have occasional stinging, itching or burning sensations. It’s often misidentified as other types of skin rashes, which can be an issue when it comes to treatment.

Steroid-based ointments that work well with other skin ailments could have the opposite effect with peri-oral dermatitis. If you’re using that kind of cream out of your medicine cabinet, your rash may look better initially because the steroid constricts the tiny blood vessels in the skin. But the reduction in redness won’t last as the steroid tends to suppress the skin’s natural healing capacity with continued use.

The best treatment for peri-oral dermatitis is to first stop using any topical steroid ointments, including other-the-counter hydrocortisone, and any other medications, lotions or creams on it. Instead, wash your skin with a mild soap. Although the rash may flare up initially, it should begin to subside after a few days.

A physician can further treat it with antibiotic lotions typically containing Clindamycin or Metronidazole, or a non-prescription, anti-itch lotion for a less severe case. For many this clears up the condition long-term, but there’s always the possibility of relapse. A repeat of this treatment is usually effective.

Tell your dentist if you have recurring bouts of a rash that match these descriptions. More than likely you’ll be referred to a dermatologist for treatment. With the right attention—and avoiding the wrong treatment ointment—you’ll be able to say goodbye to this annoying and embarrassing rash.

If you would like more information on peri-oral dermatitis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.